SONGS
ADVERTISE
Advertise with us:
R10 000 pm VAT excl.

Description: The Leopard

BACK
HOME » Leopards » Description: The Leopard

Reproduction in leopards

6 September 2013

 

The basic determinants for the survival of a leopard population are nutrition and reproduction, and the nutritional status of a female leopard affects her fertility. Because a leopard is a solitary animal, the  sexes mainly make contact when mating, and the males occasionally during a territorial dispute.

When a leopard moves about its range, it continually leaves various chemical signals that are linked to urine secretion. These chemicals are hormones that are released into the urine by glands in the anal sac and are commonly known as pheromones. The word pheromone is derived from the Greek words phero to transport or bear and hormon to set in motion. These pheromones act outside the body of the secreting individual and relay many messages within and between individuals of the same species that trigger social responses. These responses are related to territorial use, alarms, trails, individual identity, food resources, sexual receptivity and others that reflect social behaviour and physiological state. They are effective even when being diluted over long distances. However, there are physical limits on the practical size of the organisms involved because only the larger animals can produce sensible concentrations rapidly enough to be useful as chemical messengers... (Become a subscriber for more)

 

References:

Skinner, J D & C T Chimimba (Eds) 2005. The mammals of the southern African subregion, third edition. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, pp. 385 - 390.

Sunquist, M & F Sunquist 2002. Wild cats of the World. Chicago: Chicago University Press, pp. 318 - 342.

 

Click here to buy music, videos and images

SONGS
ADVERTISE
Advertise with us:
R10 000 pm VAT excl.